Adding The Linux (and Windows) System as a Network Drive

When you add the Linux or Windows System as a network drive within Windows, you can access the systems as if it were an additional drive in your computer (assuming you have an internet connection). You can access all the files from the Windows system (the lab computers) by adding the Windows and access your Linux files through the Linux access. Here's how to add these to Windows 10.

The steps to add either system are fairly similar, so here are the steps:

  1. Open File Explorer and go to This PC. 
  2. Click "Map Network Drive" in the top ribbon.
  3. Select what Drive letter you want the network drive to use (this doesn't matter; use whatever letter you want) and click "Connect using different credentials" so you can enter your University username and password.
  4. For Linux Share:
    1. Enter "\\neon.cs.clemson.edu\home" into the box. 
    2. Click Finish and enter your University username (with @clemson.edu) and password. (You might have to click "more choices" in the login window to be able to enter a new username/password.) 
    3. Click OK.
  5. For Windows Share:
    1. Enter "\\home.clemson.edu\<username>" where <username> is your University username. 
    2. Click Finish and enter your University username (without @clemson.edu) and password. (You might have to click "more choices" in the login window to be able to enter a new username/password.) 
    3. Click OK.

Now, this system will appear (available only when you are connected to the University wired/wireless network or through the VPN) in "This PC". You can read and write files to these "drives" just as you would with any other storage device. Be aware that these "drives" will be slower (smaller bandwidth) that an internal drive due to the necessity to send all the data over the (relatively) slow network.

© John Hollowell